Global Restrictions on Religion

source – pewforum.org

‘Global Restrictions on Religion’, a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life, finds that 64 nations – about one-third of the countries in the world – have high or very high restrictions on religion. But because some of the most restrictive countries are very populous, nearly 70 percent of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in countries with high restrictions on religion, the brunt of which often falls on religious minorities.

Some restrictions result from government actions, policies and laws. Others result from hostile acts by private individuals, organizations and social groups. The highest overall levels of restrictions are found in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Iran, where both the government and society at large impose numerous limits on religious beliefs and practices. But government policies and social hostilities do not always move in tandem.

Vietnam and China, for instance, have high government restrictions on religion but are in the moderate or low range when it comes to social hostilities. Nigeria and Bangladesh follow the opposite pattern: high in social hostilities but moderate in terms of government actions.

Aid to the Church in Need

source – www.kirche-in-not.org

‘Aid to the Church in Need’ (ACN) is an international pastoral aid organization of the Catholic Church, which yearly offers financial support to between 5,000 and 6,000 projects worldwide. ACN helps the poor and persecuted churches with prayer, pastoral relief and material assistance.

Following a 1984 decree of the Vatican Congregation for the Clergy, “Aid to the Church in Need” is recognized by the Catholic Church as a “universal public association of faithful”.

ACN raised 2008 Euro 82 million. The money distributed in 137 different countries around the world comes entirely from donations. ACN receives no public or official Church monies whatsoever, but relies on the generosity of more than 700,000 individual benefactors around the world.

Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, launched in 2001, seeks to promote a deeper understanding of issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs.

The Forum pursues its mission by delivering timely, impartial information to national opinion leaders, including government officials and journalists. As a nonpartisan, non-advocacy organization, the Forum does not take positions on policy debates.

Based in Washington, D.C., the Forum is directed by Luis Lugo. The Forum is a project of the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan “fact tank” that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. The Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts.